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How Often Do You Trim Dog Nails? Our Guide Here

By
 Danica Rojero 
on 
May 16, 2021

The answer to "how often should you trim your dog's nails" is a bit more complicated than you might first think.

If you've ever taken your dog to a grooming salon, chances are good that you've encountered clippers specifically designed for trimming your dog's nails. 

But, is it really necessary to give Fido a pedicure every time you take him to the salon? What should you use to trim your dog's nails at home? And is trimming really safe for your dog? (And your furniture?)

Dog nails can be tricky to trim. The quick (blood vessels and nerves that supply the nail) is located towards the back of the nail, which makes a dog’s nail more prone to bleeding if trimmed incorrectly.

When trimming your dog’s nails, remember to keep them at a length that is appropriate for their lifestyle.

Dogs that spend time outdoors or that often run off-leash should have their nails clipped to prevent them from splintering or cracking, which can lead to infection.

The Rule of Thumb

If you have a dog, you probably know that taking care of its nails is a part of its daily routine. When your dog is not scratching, climbing or digging, you should take its nails into consideration. If you do not pay attention to your dog’s nails, you risk a lot of pain for your dog and damage for your furniture.

 When it comes to dog grooming, nail trimming is one of the most important preventative measures you can take. While it may seem like a pain, if you want to avoid cutting your dog's nails too short, or even causing him pain, it's a task worth doing once or twice a week.

Dog nails need regular trims in order to keep them short. This can be done with a pair of nail clippers, but nail files are better.

When it comes to nail clippers, the old saying "the sharper, the better" applies. Sharp clippers cut through the nail with less effort than dull clippers, and you are less likely to accidentally cut the quick (the vein in the dog's nail that carries blood).

The quick grows right up to the end of the nail, so you can trim it close without cutting it if you use sharp nail clippers. If the clippers you use are not sharp enough, work the clippers back and forth several times to sharpen them before using them.

Also, the wider the nail clippers, the easier they will be to use and the less likely you will be to accidentally cut into the quick.

Consider a Dremel/Nail Grinder

The first step in trimming dog nails is to gather the equipment you'll need. You'll need a nail grinder, such as the Dremel, or nail clipper, a dog nail care kit, and a soft cloth. Start by clipping the dog's nails as far back as you can, without hurting her.

This will reduce the risk of trimming too far. When you are ready to trim, place the dog's paw on the soft cloth, or in the dog nail care kit, to give her something to bite on. If she is anxious, hold her head and talk to her. If she is really nervous, try offering her a small treat, such as a little piece of dog food or a dog biscuit.

A Dremel nail grinder is a great alternative to using nail clippers to trim your dog’s nails. It’s quicker and more humane than cutting, and it can be less stressful for both you and your dog. But, how often should you use it? It depends on how long your dog’s nails grow and how fast you want to trim them.

The initial investment in a Dremel nail grinder is small compared to buying clippers or hiring a groomer, but it will save you money in the long run.

A Dremel nail grinder runs around $30 at pet supply stores and is often cheaper online.

Training Your Dog to Accept Getting Their Nails Trimmed

If your dog is scared when getting their nails trimmed, you may be surprised to learn that you are the one who is to blame. Although it can be difficult for pet owners to accept, the fact that dogs hate getting their nails trimmed is in large part due to the owner's behavior.

Many owners unintentionally display negative reinforcement toward the dog while attempting to trim the nails, which makes the experience for the dog that much more painful.

The key to getting your dog to accept the experience is to keep them from associating the process with anything negative.

Failing to Cut Your Dogs Nails

Keeping your dogs nails trimmed is a very important part of your dogs overall grooming. Not being able to walk properly can cause your dog a lot of discomfort.

If your dogs nails are not trimmed in a timely manner, you run the risk of the quick (the pink area of the nail) growing into the nail.

When the quick grows into the nails that is called the quick growth. If your dog steps on something that pokes the quick growth, your dog will yelp and you will know something is wrong.

Correct length for a dog's nails

The correct length for a dog's nails depends on how active it is. If you have a non-active dog that doesn’t run around and jump in puddles or off the furniture, it may be able to get away with nails that are slightly longer than the recommended length.

However, if your dog is an active dog that likes to run and play, you may need to take to the clippers to its nails. 

When it comes to dog’s nails, it is important to know the correct length for a dog’s nails. Long nails can cause discomfort to your dog, and can even damage your flooring.

Short nails can cause your dog to scratch you. The best time to trim your dog’s nails is when they are still young. You should be able to see a pink line inside of the dog’s nails.

Last Words

As human’s best friends, it is important to do the best for our pets. One of the main ways we can do this is by taking care of their overall health. This includes making sure they are up to date on all of their shots and monitoring for fleas and other parasites. But one of the most overlooked aspects of our dogs’ health is their toenails. Many people fail to realize that their dog’s nails should be trimmed regularly to prevent them from becoming snagged on rough surfaces and this can lead to serious injury.

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